Frequently Asked Questions

I have compiled a list of questions that I get asked most about the Abandoned Rails website. Hopefully, if you have a question, it is answered here. If not, you can always !


Q:I have pictures/information/maps of an abandoned railroad line. How can I submit it to the Abandoned Rails website?

A: Just , and include the information and pictures as attachments. If you have a Google Map that you've drawn, include a link to that map in the email. Or if you used Google Earth, simply attach the saved KMZ or KML file and I will post it to the site.

Greg Harrison
PO Box 79061
Saginaw, TX  76179

Or, I also accept items via the U.S. Postal Service:

Q: I emailed pictures/information/maps of an abandoned railroad line, but I don't see it on the Abandoned Rails website yet. Why?

A: Fortunately, the hunt for abandoned rails intrigues more than just a few railfans; thus I get a lot of information about a lot of different lines. Sometimes it takes me a while to sort through everything before posting it to the site. But rest assured that I did get your information and will let you know when I post it!

Q: Can I help with posting content to Abandoned Rails?

A: At this time, no. But I am working on a self-submission form on the site that would allow you to directly submit your pictures/informaton/maps of an abandoned railroad route; anything you submit in this way would be posted immediately to the website without going through me.

Q: I noticed that a particular abandoned railroad line is not featured on your website. Why not?

A: Most of the abandoned routes featured on Abandoned Rails are submitted by people around the country. With thousands of miles of abandoned railroad lines, the website is far from complete (nor will it ever be, I'm afraid). But you can help! If you see that an abandoned route near you is missing on this website, please email me any pictures/information/maps you have of the line and I will gladly post it to the site!

Q: Is it safe/legal to walk/travel along an abandoned railroad corridor?

A: In most cases it is considered tresspassing and illegal. A majority of abandoned railroad right-of-ways are still owned by the operating railroad company. If a police officer (or other peace officer) observes you on an abandoned railroad right-of-way, their duty is to protect that right-of-way and ask that you leave the premises, and they may even give you a ticket for tresspassing. Please be safe and mindful of the law when hunting abandoned rails!

Q: There is an abandoned railroad track near me that I know nothing about, and is not featured on your website. How do I go about researching it?

A: While the Internet is a good tool for researching abandoned railroads, the best way is to visit local libraries along the line that may contain historical information about the town (which in most cases was founded because of the very railroad line in question). Also, talking to local citizens that live along the railroad track is another good way to gather information about the line, as long as you are respectful of them and their privacy. Finally, consider joining the Abandoned Railroads group at Yahoo.com, which is affiliated with this website. You can talk to other knowledgable people there that may just have the information you're looking for. And remember, once you do get information, please email it to me so that I can post it to the website! You will get credit for anything you contribute.

Q: Do you have any employee records of former railroad companies? I am looking for information about a relative of mine that used to work for one of them.

A: Sorry, but I do not have any employee records, nor do I know where to find them.